AAA Study Supports Speed and Red-Light Cameras

AAA Study

American Traffic Solutions (ATS), the leading road safety camera provider in North America, is pleased but not surprised with the national survey results from AAA Foundation that show a majority of U.S. drivers support photo enforcement programs to prevent speeding in school zones and to stop red-light running.

Among the many important points in this study, two that strike at the heart of ATS’ road safety efforts show that drivers recognize speeding and red-light running to be a serious threat to their safety, and they favor speed and red-light cameras as a means to stop this dangerous behavior. This survey confirms what we have long held at ATS.

The report is available online at: https://www.aaafoundation.org/sites/default/files/2014TSCIreport.pdf

Released this week, the AAA Foundation Traffic Safety Culture Index Report found:

  • 55.4% of most drivers somewhat or strongly support using school zone speed safety cameras;
  • 54.6% of drivers somewhat or strongly support using red-light cameras in urban areas, and
  • 53.3% of drivers somewhat or strongly support using red-light cameras on residential streets.
  • 86% of drivers favor a vision to reduce the number of people killed in motor vehicle crashes to zero

The study also found:

  • 95.7% of drivers say it is somewhat or completely unacceptable to drive 10 mph over the speed limit in a school zone;
  • 94.0% of drivers say it is somewhat or completely unacceptable to drive through a red light when the motorist could have stopped safely, and
  • 92.2% of drivers say it is somewhat or completely unacceptable to drive 10 mph over the speed limit on a residential street;

Participants were asked questions about threats on the highway, acceptability of behaviors, support for laws and countermeasures, and frequency of engaging in risky behaviors. Along with national findings, this year’s report is the first to include state level findings. The sampling was expanded to allow for reporting at the state level for 24 states, which cover 80 percent of the U.S. population.

 

February 12th, 2015|